CEPR

May 28, 2016

06:45:00 PM - 07:15:00 PM

Location:

Penguin Random House, Booth 111
Americas Hall I
New York Hilton Midtown Hotel
New York, NY 10019

Alexander Main and Dan Beeton will sign copies of "The WikiLeaks Files: The World According to US Empire."

May 28, 2016

04:45:00 PM - 06:15:00 PM

Roundtable at LASA2016

May 28, 2016
12:45 to 2:15pm

In 2009 and 2010, Wikileaks released over 250,000 classified cables from U.S. diplomatic missions worldwide. Initially, the cables received intense media coverage that often focused on revelations of potentially illegal or embarrassing conduct by foreign officials. Since then, few reporters or scholars have shown much interest in the cables. Over the past five years, only a tiny number of Wikileaks cable citations have appeared in leading U.S. academic journals.

Have the Wikileaks cables received the attention they deserve? Have we assimilated what the cables can teach us about U.S. foreign policy in action? Are the research opportunities offered by the Wikileaks cache of cables being fully exploited?

We will address these questions from a variety of perspectives, focusing on the Wikileaks trove of cables from Latin America. First, we will offer a critical assessment of media coverage of the Latin America cables, in the U.S. and the rest of the region, and academia's use of these cables. We will then look at how the cables shed new light on "soft" forms of U.S. political intervention in the region, based on research undertaken for the Latin America chapters in The WikiLeaks Files. Finally, we will draw from recent research in the area of U.S.-Mexico relations to examine what the cables tell us about U.S. security assistance to Mexico and the human rights vetting of Mexican security agents by the U.S. State Department.

Panel chair:

Alexander Main, Center for Economic and Policy Research

Panelists:

  • Keane Bhatt

  • Dan Beeton, Center for Economic and Policy Research

  • Jesse Franzblau

May 27, 2016

9:45 AM - 11:15 AM

Las relaciones de América Latina y el Caribe con Estados Unidos se encuentran en un período de reconfiguración que responde a dinámicas diversas y planos superpuestos en los cuales, como mínimo, confluyen el sistema de relaciones internacionales, la pluralidad de las políticas internas y externas de los estados-naciones y sus interacciones, las conexiones y acciones de actores regionales y extra-regionales, de organismos multilaterales, gubernamentales y no gubernamentales, trasnacionales, lícitos e ilícitos. Al mismo tiempo, la región de América Latina y el Caribe en su diversidad y pluralidad está reacomodando sus posiciones y, sumergida en la búsqueda de soluciones a problemas acuciantes, ha creado espacios regionales y subregionales de diferentes signos y con énfasis diversos. Este panel busca analizar y exponer algunas lecturas sobre esta complejidad regional atendiendo a las orientaciones de política exterior que son gestadas de Estados Unidos hacia el hemisferio occidental a través de distintos enfoques regionales.

Sponsor: Latin American Perspectives (LAP)

Session Organizer: Daniela C Castorena Sánchez, Universidad
Nacional Autónoma de México

Chair: Jaime Zuluaga, Universidad Externado de Colombia

Las relaciones hemisféricas y su manifestación en las Cumbres de las Américas del siglo XXI: Leandro A Morgenfeld, Universidad de Buenos Aires

Las políticas de Estados Unidos hacia América Latina y el Caribe: una mirada después del restablecimiento de sus relaciones oficiales con Cuba: Luis Suárez Salazar, Instituto Superior de Relaciones Internacionales

The next U.S. president and Latin America: an analysis of possible scenarios for U.S. hemispheric relations during the next U.S. presidential administration: Alexander Main, Center for Economic and Policy Research

Los cuatro pilares de la Política Exterior de Estados Unidos en el Hemisferio Occidental: un acercamiento crítico desde el caso mexicano: Daniela C Castorena Sánchez, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México

Discussant: Santiago Espinosa Bejerano, Centro de Investigaciones de Política Internacional

May 19, 2016

03:00:00 PM

Private Fund Conference and Report: "Public Pension Plans and Private Funds — Common Goals, Conflicting Interests" featuring CEPR's Eileen Appelbaum

Hosts:
Lowell Milken Institute and UCLA School of Law

Location:
UCLA School of Law, Room 1457

Public pension plans remain the most significant investors in private equity funds and hedge funds today. Historically, plan trustees have invested in these funds to boost their returns — a critical goal for the beneficiaries of these plans. Renewed attention has been focused recently on the costs and expenses incurred by public pension plans when they entrust their beneficiaries' saving with private funds.

This year's Private Fund Conference, sponsored by the Lowell Milken Institute and UCLA School of Law, will address a number of pressing issues that impact the legal obligations of both the public plans and the alternative investment firms that they retain.

May 11, 2016

11:00:00 PM - 12:00:00 AM

Book Talk: "Failed: What the ‘Experts' Got Wrong About the Global Economy"

Hosted by the Social Justice Initiative at the University of Illinois-Chicago

Pop Up Just Art Gallery (PUJA)
729 Maxwell St
Chicago, IL 60607

Wednesday, May 11, 2016 6:00 PM (CDT)

Mark Weisbrot at the Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR), will give a talk on his new book, Failed: What the "Experts" Got Wrong About the Global Economy. The book analyzes long-term economic failures, from the Eurozone to developing countries. It shows how political agendas are often at the root of long-term economic failures and — as in the Eurozone — can prolong financial crisis unnecessarily. A Q&A session will follow the talk.

Please RSVP here, seating is limited.

May 10, 2016

10:30:00 PM - 12:00:00 AM

Public Policy Lecture Series
Department of Public Policy and Administration
National Louis University
Chicago Campus
122 S. Michigan Ave
Chicago, Illinois 60603

May 10, 2016
5:30—7:00PM (CDT)

Why has the Eurozone ended up with an unemployment rate more than twice that of the United States more than six years after the collapse of Lehman Brothers? Why did the vast majority of low- and middle-income countries suffer a prolonged economic slowdown in the last two decades of the 20th century? What was the role of the International Monetary Fund in these economic failures? Why was Latin America able to achieve substantial poverty reduction in the 21st century after more than two decades without any progress?

"Failed: What the 'Experts' Got Wrong About the Global Economy" (Oxford University Press, 2015)" analyzes these questions, explaining why these important economic developments of recent years have been widely misunderstood and in some cases almost completely ignored. First, in the Eurozone, Mark Weisbrot argues that the European authorities' political agenda, which included shrinking the welfare state, reducing healthcare, pension and other social spending, and reducing the bargaining power of labor played a very important role in prolonging the Eurozone's financial crisis and its lapse into years of recession and mass unemployment. This conclusion is based not only on public statements of European officials, but also on thousands of pages of documentation from consultations between the IMF and European governments after 2008.

The second central theme of "Failed" is that there are always practical alternatives to extended economic failure. Drawing on the history of other financial crises, recessions, and recoveries, Weisbrot argues that regardless of initial conditions, there have been and remain economically feasible choices for governments of the Eurozone to greatly reduce unemployment—including the hardest-hit, the crisis-ridden country of Greece.

The long-term economic failure of developing countries, its social consequences, as well as the subsequent recovery in the first decade of the 21st century, constitute the third part of the book's narrative, one that has previously gotten too little attention. We see why the International Monetary Fund has lost influence in middle-income countries. "Failed" also examines the economic causes and consequences of Latin America's "second independence" and rebound in the 21st century, as well as the challenges that lie ahead.

 

Register here.

May 10, 2016

09:00:00 PM - 10:00:00 PM

HostsBrazilian Expats for Democracy

 

Location: 
AFL-CIO 
815 16th St., N.W. 
Washington, D.C. 20006

 

Brazilian Expats for Democracy (BED) is a Washington DC area-based group working to raise awareness about the current political crisis in Brazil and the impeachment process against Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff.

The goals of this discussion are twofold; first, to critically analyze the dominant narrative surrounding the ongoing impeachment process; and second, to highlight different perspectives on the current crisis that have so far received significantly less mainstream media attention, including those from intellectual, feminist and youth. 

This discussion will promote a more comprehensive perspective on the complexities of Brazil's recent development trajectory and current social struggle, and the possible consequences of the politically-motivated change that is unfolding rapidly and without adequate and balanced public debate and consent.

 

Keynote Speaker

 

Cathy Feingold

Director of International Affairs, AFL-CIO

 

Panelists

Ricardo Carneiro

Executive Director for Brazil, Inter-American Development Bank (IDB)

 

Alex Main

Senior Associate for International Policy, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR)

 

Mariana Joffily

Professor, History Department, University of Santa Catarina, Brazil

 

James Early

Former Director of Cultural Heritage Policy at the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage at the Smithsonian Institute; Ph. D. in Latin American and Caribbean History

May 10, 2016

04:15:00 PM - 05:30:00 PM

"Trends in Domestic Outsourcing in the United States" featuring CEPR's Eileen Appelbaum

Hosts:
Washington Center for Equitable Growth

Location:
Washington Center for Equitable Growth
1500 K St. NW, Suite 850
Washington, D.C. 20005
(Entrance on 15th Street)

The Washington Center for Equitable Growth would like to invite you to the next installment in our new academic seminar series. 

Our next seminar will take place on Tuesday, May 10, 2016 from 12:15PM to 1:30PM. Professor Rosemary Batt of Cornell University, and currently visiting at Equitable Growth, and Eileen Appelbaum, senior economist at the Center for Economic and Policy Research, will present a research agenda to analyze trends in "domestic outsourcing" in the United States. They examine firms' use of contractors and independent contractors and how this affects job quality and inequality. If you would like to read the paper in advance, you can find it here.

Please contact Carmen Ye at cye [at] equitablegrowth.org to RSVP by May 5, 2016. We will serve lunch starting at 12:15 p.m., and the program will start promptly at 12:30 p.m. Due to building security, RSVP is required.

May 2, 2016

11:30:00 PM

Panel Discussion on Income Inequality

Hosts:
Jewish Community Centers of Greater Boston

Location:
Leventhal-Sidman JCC
333 Nahanton Street, Newton, MA 02459

Seven years after the depths of the financial crisis, Wall Street and the 1% have mostly recovered. Yet wages for the ordinary American have barely risen. Reducing income inequality is no longer just an economic issue or debate topic in the current presidential primaries; it is a "moral imperative." Or is it? Experts from all sides of the issue discuss what income inequality means for America during a panel discussion on Monday, May 2, at the Leventhal-Sidman Jewish Community Center (333 Nahanton Street) in Newton.

Moderating the conversation will be Roger Lowenstein, former Wall Street Journal reporter and bestselling author (When Genius Failed; The End of Wall Street; Buffett — The Making of an American Capitalist). Panelists are:

Dean Baker, co-founder of the Center for Economic and Policy Research in Washington, D.C. and author of Getting Back to Full Employment: A Better Bargain for Working People and The End of Loser Liberalism: Making Markets Progressive. His blog, Beat the Press, provides commentary on economic reporting.

N. Gregory Mankiw, Professor of Economics at Harvard University. His research includes work on monetary and fiscal policy, and economic growth. His published articles have appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post and Fortune. He has been an adviser to the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston and the Congressional Budget Office.

Dr. Kim Weeden, Director of the Center for the Study of Inequality at Cornell University. She studies rising income inequality; social class, gender, and race-based differences in educational attainment; and gender inequality in the labor market. Her research has appeared in The New York Times, The Atlantic, and Harvard Business Review.

Mind the Gap: Income Inequality in America is part of the Jonathan Samen Hot Buttons, Cool Conversations Discussion Series at the JCC — a program of the Ryna Greenbaum JCC Center for the Arts. Tickets are $18. Visit www.bostonjcc.org/hotbuttons or contact 866-811-4111 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

April 29, 2016

01:00:00 PM - 10:00:00 PM

Rules, Rights and Resistance: The Battle Over TPP and TTIP at The New School featuring CEPR's Dean Baker.

Hosts:
The New School

Location:
The Auditorium, Alvin Johnson/J.M. Kaplan Hall
66 West 12th Street
New York, NY 10011

Cast as "trade agreements", a momentous re-writing and consolidation of the basic rules governing the global economy is being pursued across the globe. At play is much more than "trade". Driven by commercial interest and industry associations, the rules in these agreements - like the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP), and TransAtlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) - cover core elements of politics and economics, including investment, dispute resolution, intellectual property, public procurement policy and much more. As such, they can both re-shape and lock-in the reach and power of multinational corporations; the lines between public and private; the role and efficacy of governance globally and nationally; and the enormous power imbalances among classes, regions and countries. Done in secrecy, they threaten to undermine hard-won basic citizen rights - to open government, access to justice, livelihoods and a stable and healthy environment.

Bringing together noted academics and advocates, "Rules, Rights and Resistance" presents a day-long exploration of what is at play in the struggle over "trade agreements": what they portend, the resistances they have generated, and the horizons for rewriting and implementing alternative rules.

The event is no cost, although registration is required.

April 27, 2016

11:00 AM - 12:30 PM

Coloquio internacional

La Revolución Bolivariana: de la democracia protagónica al Estado comunal. Avances y retos.

Miércoles 27 de abril de 2016

10:30-12:00 (CDT)

Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)
Salón de Actos, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras

 Conferencias magistrales.

 Eje 1: Economía política y desarrollo: ¿neodesarrollismo, extractivismo o socialismo?

Alfredo Serrano Mancilla, Director del Centro Estrategico Latinoamericanos de Geopolitica (CELAG)

Luis Salsa Rodríguez, Centro de Estudios de Economía Políticas de la Universidad Bolivariana de Venezuela (UBV)

Mark Weisbrot, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR), Washington

March 31, 2016

11:00:00 PM

D.C. Premiere and Campaign for "The Same Heart," featuring CEPR's Dean Baker.

Hosts:
Media Voices for Children, Motema Music and Blue Note Entertainment Group

Location:
Howard Theatre
620 T St. NW
Washington, DC 20001

Join us for the D.C. premiere of The Same Heart, the new documentary film from Len and Georgia Morris that explores a wide range of problems children face around the world. The documentary propose a solution to help combat these problems — a financial transaction tax that would provide billions of dollars in resources.

There will be a Q&A session after the screening with noted economist Dean Baker. Wrapping up the evening will be an Afro Dance Party featuring Awa Sangho, and other performances by Charnett Moffett and Volker Goetze. 

Click here to screen the trailer. 

Tickets are available at the Howard box office or through Ticketmaster:

  • $35 general admission/$45 at the door

  • $20 student admission/$25 at the door

  • $100 premium banquette seating (includes a DVD of the Same Heart and a copy of the soundtrack CD


Doors open at 6pm and the show starts at 7pm. Cash bar and food available.

March 31, 2016

10:00:00 PM - 11:30:00 PM

LIS Inequality Lecture Series with Mark Weisbrot
Luxembourg Income Study Center

Room 5414
CUNY Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10016

March 31, 2016
6:00—7:30PM

Why has the Eurozone ended up with an unemployment rate more than twice that of the United States more than six years after the collapse of Lehman Brothers? Why did the vast majority of low- and middle-income countries suffer a prolonged economic slowdown in the last two decades of the 20th century? What was the role of the International Monetary Fund in these economic failures? Why was Latin America able to achieve substantial poverty reduction in the 21st century after more than two decades without any progress?

"Failed: What the 'Experts' Got Wrong About the Global Economy" (Oxford University Press, 2015)" analyzes these questions, explaining why these important economic developments of recent years have been widely misunderstood and in some cases almost completely ignored. First, in the Eurozone, Mark Weisbrot argues that the European authorities' political agenda, which included shrinking the welfare state, reducing healthcare, pension and other social spending, and reducing the bargaining power of labor played a very important role in prolonging the Eurozone's financial crisis and its lapse into years of recession and mass unemployment. This conclusion is based not only on public statements of European officials, but also on thousands of pages of documentation from consultations between the IMF and European governments after 2008.

The second central theme of "Failed" is that there are always practical alternatives to extended economic failure. Drawing on the history of other financial crises, recessions, and recoveries, Weisbrot argues that regardless of initial conditions, there have been and remain economically feasible choices for governments of the Eurozone to greatly reduce unemployment—including the hardest-hit, the crisis-ridden country of Greece.

The long-term economic failure of developing countries, its social consequences, as well as the subsequent recovery in the first decade of the 21st century, constitute the third part of the book's narrative, one that has previously gotten too little attention. We see why the International Monetary Fund has lost influence in middle-income countries. "Failed" also examines the economic causes and consequences of Latin America's "second independence" and rebound in the 21st century, as well as the challenges that lie ahead.

Free and open for all!

RSVP to njohnson[at]gradcenter.cuny.edu or ian.haberman[at]gmail.com.

This event is part of the LIS Center Inequality Lecture Series, and is cohosted by the GC Students Association for LIS Inequality Research.

March 29, 2016

08:00:00 PM - 09:30:00 PM

Economics Seminar with Mark Weisbrot of the Center for Economic and Policy Research

Sponsored by the Economics Department at the New School for Social Research

Room D1009, Albert and Vera List Academic Center
6 East 16th Street, 10th Floor, New York, NY 10011

March 29, 2016
4:005:30PM

Why has the Eurozone ended up with an unemployment rate more than twice that of the United States more than six years after the collapse of Lehman Brothers? Why did the vast majority of low- and middle-income countries suffer a prolonged economic slowdown in the last two decades of the 20th century? What was the role of the International Monetary Fund in these economic failures? Why was Latin America able to achieve substantial poverty reduction in the 21st century after more than two decades without any progress?

"Failed: What the 'Experts' Got Wrong About the Global Economy" (Oxford University Press, 2015)" analyzes these questions, explaining why these important economic developments of recent years have been widely misunderstood and in some cases almost completely ignored. First, in the Eurozone, Mark Weisbrot argues that the European authorities' political agenda, which included shrinking the welfare state, reducing healthcare, pension and other social spending, and reducing the bargaining power of labor played a very important role in prolonging the Eurozone's financial crisis and its lapse into years of recession and mass unemployment. This conclusion is based not only on public statements of European officials, but also on thousands of pages of documentation from consultations between the IMF and European governments after 2008.

The second central theme of "Failed" is that there are always practical alternatives to extended economic failure. Drawing on the history of other financial crises, recessions, and recoveries, Weisbrot argues that regardless of initial conditions, there have been and remain economically feasible choices for governments of the Eurozone to greatly reduce unemployment—including the hardest-hit, the crisis-ridden country of Greece.

The long-term economic failure of developing countries, its social consequences, as well as the subsequent recovery in the first decade of the 21st century, constitute the third part of the book's narrative, one that has previously gotten too little attention. We see why the International Monetary Fund has lost influence in middle-income countries. "Failed" also examines the economic causes and consequences of Latin America's "second independence" and rebound in the 21st century, as well as the challenges that lie ahead.

Free and open for all!

February 27, 2016

02:30:00 PM - 03:50:00 PM

Eastern Economic Association
42nd Annual Conference
(Registration required)

Roundtable: Institutions and Development in Latin America


Saturday, February 27, 2016
9:30-10:50

Washington Marriott Warman Park
2660 Woodley Road NW
Washington, DC 20009

Session Chair: Robert Blecker, American University

Session Organizer: Matías Vernengo, Bucknell University; Esteban Pérez Caldentey, ECLAC

Panelists:
Otaviano Canuto, IMF
Esteban Pérez Caldentey, ECLAC
Matías Vernengo, Bucknell University
Carlos Vegh, Johns Hopkins University
Mark Weisbrot, CEPR

January 30, 2016

07:00:00 PM - 09:00:00 PM

Ever considered why the eurozone has ended up with an unemployment rate more than twice that of the United States, seven years after the collapse of Lehman Brothers? Or why the vast majority of low- and middle-income countries suffered a prolonged economic slowdown in the last two decades of the 20th century? These questions don't have much prominence in current presidential debates, but they are very relevant to some that do, including the current prospects for the U.S. economy and the global economic turbulence.  They are examined in the new book, "Failed: What the 'Experts' Got Wrong about the Global Economy" (Oxford University Press, 2015), by economist Mark Weisbrot. Mark will speak and sign books at Prairie Lights Books, 15 South Dubuque Street in Iowa City on Saturday, January 30 at 2:00 PM.

According to Weisbrot, understanding the recent history of economic policy failures — and successes — can provide many important lessons to presidential candidates and other policy makers. Weisbrot argues that many of the most important economic developments of recent years have been widely misunderstood—and in some cases almost completely ignored. He claims that the European authorities' political agenda, which has included shrinking the welfare state, reducing healthcare, pension and other social spending, and reducing the bargaining power of labor, played a very important role in prolonging the eurozone's financial crisis, additional years of recession, and current levels of mass unemployment.


Weisbrot examines the history of other financial crises, recessions, and recoveries, and argues that there are always economic policy options that would avoid long-term economic failures. Weisbrot examines what U.S. policy makers and the Fed did right — and what they could have done better — and what can be learned from the negative example of Europe over the past six years.

The historic, decades-long economic decline in the vast majority of developing countries at the end of the 20th century constitute the third part of the book's narrative. Weisbrot also examines the economic causes and consequences of Latin America's "second independence" and economic rebound in the 21st century, as well as the challenges that lie ahead.

Mark Weisbrot is Co-Director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research in Washington, D.C. He received his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan. He is co-author, with Dean Baker, of Social Security: The Phony Crisis, and has written numerous research papers on economic policy. He writes a column on economic and policy issues that is distributed to over 550 newspapers by the Tribune Content Agency. His opinion pieces have appeared in The Guardian, New York Times, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times and most major U.S. newspapers, as well as in Brazil's largest newspaper, Folha de São Paulo. He appears regularly on national and local television and radio programs. He is also president of Just Foreign Policy.

January 28, 2016

11:30:00 PM - 01:30:00 AM

Ever considered why the Eurozone has ended up with an unemployment rate more than twice that of the United States, seven years after the collapse of Lehman Brothers? Or why the vast majority of low- and middle-income countries suffered a prolonged economic slowdown in the last two decades of the 20th century? These questions don't have much prominence in current presidential debates, but they are very relevant to some that do, including the current prospects for the U.S. economy and the global economic turbulence.  They are examined in the new book, "Failed: What the 'Experts' Got Wrong about the Global Economy" (Oxford University Press, 2015), by economist Mark Weisbrot. Mark will speak and sign books at Beaverdale Books, 2629 Beaver Avenue on Thursday, January 28 at 6:30 PM.  


According to Weisbrot, understanding the recent history of economic policy failures — and successes — can provide many important lessons to presidential candidates and other policy makers. Weisbrot argues that many of the most important economic developments of recent years have been widely misunderstood—and in some cases almost completely ignored. He claims that the European authorities' political agenda, which has included shrinking the welfare state, reducing healthcare, pension and other social spending, and reducing the bargaining power of labor, played a very important role in prolonging the Eurozone's financial crisis, additional years of recession, and current levels of mass unemployment.


Weisbrot examines the history of other financial crises, recessions, and recoveries, and argues that there are always economic policy options that would avoid long-term economic failures. Weisbrot examines what U.S. policy makers and the Fed did right — and what they could have done better — and what can be learned from the negative example of Europe over the past six years.


The historic, decades-long economic decline in the vast majority of developing countries at the end of the 20th century constitute the third part of the book's narrative. Weisbrot also examines the economic causes and consequences of Latin America's "second independence" and economic rebound in the 21st century, as well as the challenges that lie ahead.


Mark Weisbrot is Co-Director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research in Washington, D.C. He received his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan. He is co-author, with Dean Baker, of Social Security: The Phony Crisis, and has written numerous research papers on economic policy. He writes a column on economic and policy issues that is distributed to over 550 newspapers by the Tribune Content Agency. His opinion pieces have appeared in The Guardian, New York Times, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times and most major U.S. newspapers, as well as in Brazil's largest newspaper, Folha de São Paulo. He appears regularly on national and local television and radio programs. He is also president of Just Foreign Policy.

January 3, 2016

05:30:00 PM

David Gordon Memorial Lecture

Hosts:
Union for Radical Political Economics, as part of American Economic Association Annual Meeting (registration is required)

Location:
Marriott Marquis, Yerba Buena Salons 5 & 6
780 Mission St
San Francisco, CA 94103

Presenting the David Gordon Memorial Lecture, CEPR's Dean Baker will present Rising Inequality: Are Rents the Problem? based on a CEPR Working Paper.

This paper argues that most of the increase in inequality since 1980 can be attributed to the growth of rents in four areas: excessive CEO pay, a bloated financial sector, the expansion of patent and copyright protection, and protectionist policies to benefit highly paid professionals. The paper produces a range of estimates of amount of additional income going to high-income households from each source. It also outlines alternative policies and institutional structures that can reduce the rents in these areas back to their pre-1980 levels measured as a share of GDP.

Presiding: Fred Moseley (Mount Holyoke College)
Discussants: Heather Boushey (Washington Center for Equitable Growth)

December 16, 2015

12:00:00 AM - 01:30:00 AM

Webinar: Update on Haiti Elections Crisis

Wednesday, December 16, 2015
7:00 PM (Webinar Room Opens at 6:45 PM)

As allegations of fraud and proof of such mounted, Haiti's Provisional Electoral Council released final results for the first round of presidential elections. Daily protests and calls for fair, democratic elections haven't stopped and some are even calling for a transitional government to hold honest elections. Join us as we discuss what has happened since the August 9th round of elections, our work supporting Haitians' demands, and what we may expect of the round scheduled for December 27th.

Hosted by the Institute for Justice & Democracy in Haiti.

Featured Presenters:

  • Institute for Justice & Democracy in Haiti

  • Nik Barry-Shaw, Haiti Solidarity Activist

  • Prospere Charles, PhD, Public Policy Analyst and Social Researcher

  • Jake Johnston, Research Associate, Center for Economic and Policy Research


Register to Attend (Free)

December 8, 2015

12:00:00 AM - 01:30:00 AM

"Failed: What the 'Experts' Got Wrong About the Global Economy" (Oxford University Press, 2015) analyzes why important economic developments of recent years have been widely misunderstood, and in some cases almost completely ignored. First, in the Eurozone, Mark Weisbrot argues that the European authorities' political agenda played a very important role in prolonging the Eurozone's financial crisis and pushing it into years of recession and mass unemployment.

The second central theme of FAILED is that there are always practical alternatives to prolonged economic failure. Drawing on the history of other financial crises, recessions, and recoveries, Weisbrot also argues that regardless of initial conditions, there have been and remain economically feasible choices for governments of the Eurozone to greatly reduce unemployment-including the hardest hit, crisis ridden country of Greece.

The long-term economic failure of developing countries, its social consequences, as well as the subsequent recovery in the first decade of the 21st century, constitute the third part of the book's narrative. We see why the International Monetary Fund has lost influence in middle income countries. FAILED also examines the economic causes and consequences of Latin America's "second independence" and rebound in the twenty-first century, as well as the challenges that lie ahead.

Free and open for all!

December 4, 2015

08:45:00 PM - 10:15:00 PM

Economic Inequality: Causes, Consequences and Responses

Hosts:
Georgetown Law

Location:
Georgetown University Law Center
Gewirz Student Center, 12th Floor
120 F Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20001


We live in an age of vast economic inequality—the top 20­ percent of U.S. households owns more than 84 percent of the country's wealth, according to Scientific American. On Friday, December 4, Georgetown University Law Center will host a full­-day conference that aims to identify and understand the factors that contribute to this disparity on both a domestic and global level. Georgetown Law Dean William Treanor and Professors Mitt Regan and Peter Edelman open the conference, which includes panels on racial disadvantage, trade policy and more. Columbia University Economics Professor Dan O'Flaherty delivers a luncheon address on the economics of race in the United States, and Georgetown Law Professor Sheryll Cashin makes closing remarks.

CEPR's Dean Baker will be featured on Panel 4, Inequality as Policy.