CEPR

December 1, 2015

06:00:00 PM

Hear why the Federal Reserve should resist calls to raise interest rates in December, and learn how the Fed can prioritize full employment, push for higher wages, and ensure that your constituents share in the economic recovery.

Tuesday, December 1, 2015, 1pm

Rayburn House Office Building, Room 2226

Panelists:
Bill Spriggs, AFL-CIO
Josh Bivens, Economic Policy Institute
Dean Baker, Center for Economic and Policy Research
Carola Binder, Professor of Economics at Haverford College

Hosted by Rep. John Conyers, Co-Chair of the House Full Employment Caucus

The Federal Reserve is considered by many to be the most important economic policymaking institution in the country. In the wake of the financial crisis, Fed policymakers took extraordinary steps to help our economy recover. Yet years after the recession, labor market participation is the lowest it has been in decades, wage growth is nowhere to be seen, and Black, Latino, and youth unemployment remain above pre-recession levels in many states and cities.

Congress has tasked the Federal Reserve with creating a full employment economy where workers have bargaining power to demand higher wages, and minority workers are less vulnerable to discrimination in the labor market. Yet despite a sluggish recovery and consistently low inflation, Fed policymakers may raise interest rates as soon as mid-December, intentionally slowing down the economy, denying many Americans the chance to experience the jobs recovery, and making it much harder for the Fed to truly fulfill its full employment mandate.

That's why Rep. John Conyers and the co-chairs of the Congressional Full Employment Caucus have introduced the "Full Employment Federal Reserve Act," a bill that strengthens the full employment portion of the Fed's mandate. The bill instructs the Fed to examine factors like wage growth and involuntary part-time work in making decisions about interest rates.

This briefing is an opportunity to hear from leading economists about how the Fed can adopt policies to better facilitate wage growth and create economic stability in our communities. You will also hear testimony from constituents across the nation who are struggling with inadequate wages, insufficient hours, and impractical schedules.

We hope you will join us for this important and timely conversation. To RSVP for the event, please contact Erik Sperling at Rep. Conyers' office at Erik.Sperling [at] mail.house.gov.

November 24, 2015

06:00:00 PM - 07:00:00 PM

Congressional Black Caucus Foundation Annual Legislative Conference 2015

Honorary Host(s):
Congressman John Conyers Jr.
Congressman, Michigan-13, Washington, District of Columbia

Location:
Walter E. Washington Convention Center
Room 143A

While the reported jobless rate in America is now well under 6%, the real jobless rate is nearly 13% when we take into account those who have become too discouraged to continue looking for work and people unable to find full-time work. The rate is upwards of 25% in some communities of color. This session will focus on the need for national full employment legislation, a higher minimum wage, and innovative new strategies to promote locally-driven job creation; and address the systemic challenges of stagnant wages, declining benefits, and unsatisfactory opportunities for long-term advancement. The panel will highlight the promise of Congressman Conyers' HR 1000—the 21st Humphrey-Hawkins Century Full Employment and Training Act, as well as innovative best practices from around the nation in promoting job creation through community wealth-building, employee ownership, and other strategies for inclusive growth.


November 19, 2015

02:00:00 PM - 05:00:00 PM

WITA TPP Series, Event #1

Hosts:
Washington International Trade Association (WITA)

Location:
Ronald Reagan Building & International Trade Center
1300 Pennsylvania Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20004


The TPP is the largest trade agreement in a generation. Please Join WITA as we break down this ambitious agreement in a series of eight panel discussions that highlight critical aspects of the pact. Who wins? Who loses? What do critical stakeholders have to say? NOTE: We expect large crowds for these events, so RSVP today to reserve your spot!

What is the TPP? The View from Washington
What Does it Mean for the United States and the World?

  • Dean Baker, Co-Director, Center for Economic and Policy Research

  • Kimberly Elliott, Senior Fellow, Center for Global Development

  • Jeffrey J. Schott, Senior Fellow, Peterson Institute for International Economics

  • Scott Miller, Senior Advisor & Scholl Chair in International Business, Center for Strategic & International Studies

November 18, 2015

12:00:00 AM - 01:30:00 AM

Bankrupt Nation: Does Government Spending Threaten Your Future?

Hosts:
University of Rochester

Location:
University of Rochester, Goergen Hall 101 (Sloan Auditorium)

Student loan debt is getting a lot of attention these days, but many experts believe that college students should also fear the ever-increasing threat that federal, state, and local government spending poses to their future. Pension and health care promises made by the government are not sustainable, and if action is not taken soon, millennials will face an economic crisis of historic proportions. Other experts believe that these fears are overblown, and that governments should be expanding, not contracting, their role in society. Is there common ground to be found?

Join Professor David Primo as he leads a panel discussion about why this issue matters to you. The panelists include Dean Baker of the Center for Economic and Policy Research, Veronique de Rugy of the Mercatus Center, and Daniel DiSalvo of the Manhattan Institute.

A reception with food and drinks will follow the event.

November 17, 2015

07:30:00 PM

HEDGE FUNDS & PRIVATE EQUITY: TRANSFERRING WEALTH UP

Hosts:
Americans for Financial Reform

Location:
Capitol Visitor Center, Capitol Hill, SVC 209-08

Do private funds drive positive change and improve efficiency? Or do they drive short-termism, job losses and systemic risk in our markets? Regulators have only just begun to shine a light on these funds, revealing a host of problems and raising many more questions about their operations. Recent reports from the SEC point to rampant abuse in the industry, from charging excessive fees to generating revenue through creative accounting techniques rather than long term value creation. These new findings demonstrate a pattern of transferring wealth up, from working people to the country's richest financial managers. Join experts and legislators to discuss these issues and more.

Following a keynote address from Senator Tammy Baldwin (D-WI), the first panel will consider private equity's leveraged buyout strategies and their effects on American companies and workers. The second panel will address hedge funds and the related issues of activism, debt vulturism, high frequency trading and more. The event will close with additional comments from Senator Al Franken (D-MN) and Congresswoman Nydia Velazquez (D-NY). Confirmed speakers include:

  • Eileen Appelbaum, Senior Economist, Center for Economic and Policy· Victor Fleischer, Professor of Law, University of San Diego

  • Eric LeCompte, Executive Director, Jubilee USA Network

  • David Wood, Director, Initiative for Responsible Investment at the Kennedy School at Harvard


More speakers will be announced shortly. Coffee and snacks will be served.

Please register here.

November 16, 2015

05:00:00 PM - 06:00:00 PM

Briefing: Is Regulation to Blame for Declining Entrepreneurship?

Hosts:
Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation

Location:
Rayburn B369

Entrepreneurs are engines of job creation and economic growth. Yet, new business creation has been stalled since the end of the recession. And even before the recession, new business creation was on the decline. A "startup deficit" is afflicting the economy. The symptoms of this decline, including stalled labor force participation, low productivity growth, and wage stagnation, threaten economic growth and opportunity. To revive our economy we need to renew American entrepreneurship.

The Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation invites you to attend a lunch briefing on Monday, November 16, about regulatory policy and how it is sometimes used to protect established businesses from new challengers.

Brink Lindsey, vice president for research at the Cato Institute, and Dean Baker, co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research, will share the latest research findings and discuss policy implications.

Please register by November 9 by emailing Emily Fetsch at efetsch [at] kauffman.org.

November 7, 2015

06:30:00 PM - 09:00:00 PM

Lonestar College Civic Engagement Conference

Hosts:
Lone Star College

Location:
LSC-University Park

Lone Star College Center for Civic Engagement in cooperation with Tarrant County Community College—Southeast and The University of Houston—Downtown invites you to their conference, Economic Inequality and Civic Engagement, to be held November 6—7, 2015 at Lone Star College—University Park.

On Saturday, November 7 from 12:30PM to 2PM CST, CEPR's Dean Baker will present the keynote "Inequality: Recent Trends and Future Prospects."

November 4, 2015

10:30:00 PM - 01:00:00 AM

Busboys & Poets Author Event - Failed: What the "Experts" Got Wrong About the Global Economy

November 4, 2015
5:30-8:00PM

Busboys & Poets (5th & K)
Cullen Room

1025 5th St NW
Washington, DC 20001

MARK WEISBROT is Co-Director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research in Washington, D.C.

FAILED analyzes why important economic developments of recent years have been widely misunderstood, and in some cases almost completely ignored. First, in the Eurozone, Mark Weisbrot argues that the European authorities' political agenda played a very important role in prolonging the Eurozone's financial crisis and pushing it into years of recession and mass unemployment.

The second central theme of FAILED is that there are always practical alternatives to prolonged economic failure. Drawing on the history of other financial crises, recessions, and recoveries, Weisbrot also argues that regardless of initial conditions, there have been and remain economically feasible choices for governments of the Eurozone to greatly reduce unemployment-including the hardest hit, crisisridden country of Greece. 

The long-term economic failure of developing countries, its social consequences, as well as the subsequent recovery in the first decade of the 21st century, constitute the third part of the book's narrative. We see why the International Monetary Fund has lost influence in middle income countries. FAILED also examines the economic causes and consequences of Latin America's "second independence" and rebound in the twenty-first century, as well as the challenges that lie ahead.

Free and open for all!

October 28, 2015

04:30:00 PM - 06:00:00 PM

World Bank Group InfoShop
701 18th Street NW, Room J1-0505
Washington, D.C.

 

"Comprehensive, long overdue and a resounding success"
- Larry Elliott, Economics Editor, The Guardian


With a preface by Ha-Joon Chang, FAILED (Oxford University Press, 2015) analyzes why important economic developments of recent years have been widely misunderstood, and in some cases almost completely ignored. First, in the Eurozone, Mark Weisbrot argues that the European authorities' political agenda played a very important role in prolonging the Eurozone's financial crisis and pushing it into years of recession and mass unemployment. 
FailedBookCover

The second central theme of FAILED is that there are always practical alternatives to prolonged economic failure. Drawing on the history of other financial crises, recessions, and recoveries, Weisbrot also argues that regardless of initial conditions, there have been and remain economically feasible choices for governments of the Eurozone to greatly reduce unemployment-including the hardest hit, crisis-ridden country of Greece.

The long-term economic failure of developing countries, its social consequences, as well as the subsequent recovery in the first decade of the 21st century, constitute the third part of the book's narrative. We see why the International Monetary Fund has lost influence in middle income countries. 

FAILED also examines the economic causes and consequences of Latin America's "second independence" and rebound in the twenty-first century, as well as the challenges that lie ahead.

RSVP to worldbankevents[at]worldbank.org

October 20, 2015

02:00:00 PM

Understanding Social Security's Long-Term Fiscal Picture

Hosts:
Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs

Location:
SD-342, Dirksen Senate Office Building

CEPR's Dean Baker will testify at this hearing on Tuesday, October 29, 2015, at 10:00 a.m. in SD-342, Dirksen Senate Office Building. The hearing is entitled "Understanding Social Security's Long-Term Fiscal Picture."

October 16, 2015

04:30:00 PM - 06:00:00 PM

"Comprehensive, long overdue and a resounding success." - The Guardian

October 16, 12:30 - 2:00 p.m.

United Nations Development Programme
Amartya Sen Conference Room, 10th Floor
304 East 45th Street
New York, 10017


A presentation of "Failed" by the book's author, Mark Weisbrot, Co-Director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research, a think-tank based in Washington D.C. Discussion moderated by Gail Hurley, BPPS.

In "Failed: What the 'Experts' Got Wrong about the Global Economy," Mark analyzes why some of the most important economic developments of recent years have been widely misunderstood, and in some cases almost completely ignored. The second central theme of "Failed" is that there are always practical alternatives to prolonged economic failure. The long-term economic failure of developing countries, its social consequences, as well as the subsequent recovery in the first decade of the 21st century, constitute the third part of the book's narrative.

RSVP to gail.hurley[at]undp.org.

October 14, 2015

10:30:00 PM - 11:45:00 PM

In Print with James. F. Hoge, Jr. Featuring: Mark Weisbrot

October 14, 2015
6:30—7:45 p.m.

15 Barclay Street (bet. Broadway and Church Street) 
New York, NY 
Room: 430

This series features James F. Hoge, Jr., senior advisor, Teneo Intelligence; chairman, Human Rights Watch; and CGA Advisory Board member, in conversation with leading journalists and authors. Books are available for sale following the event.

Why has the Eurozone ended up with an unemployment rate double that of the U.S. more than six years after the 2008 collapse? Why did the majority of low- and middle-income countries suffer a prolonged economic slowdown in the final decades of the 20th century? What was the role of the International Monetary Fund in these economic failures? What accounts for Latin American economic achievements in the 21st century? Failed analyzes these questions, explaining why recent economic developments have been widely misunderstood and in some cases almost completely ignored. Drawing on the history of other financial crises, recessions, and recoveries, Weisbrot argues that economically feasible choices remain for Eurozone governments to greatly reduce unemployment - including in crisis-ridden Greece. 

Because our events are offered free of charge, seats are made available until we reach capacity; after that point, we can no longer accommodate pre-registered guests.

Contact Information:
Phone: 212-992-8380
Email: scps.global.affairs[at]nyu.edu

October 14, 2015

10:30:00 PM - 11:45:00 PM

Featuring: Mark Weisbrot

Failed: What The "Experts" Got Wrong About The Global Economy
Wednesday, October 14, 6.30—7.45 p.m.

This series features James F. Hoge, Jr., senior advisor, Teneo Intelligence; chairman, Human Rights Watch; and CGA Advisory Board member, in conversation with leading journalists and authors.

Books are available for sale following the event.

Failed: What The "Experts" Got Wrong About The Global Economy

Why has the Eurozone ended up with an unemployment rate double that of the U.S. more than six years after the 2008 collapse? Why did the majority of low- and middle-income countries suffer a prolonged economic slowdown in the final decades of the 20th century? What was the role of the International Monetary Fund in these economic failures? What accounts for Latin American economic achievements in the 21st century? Failed analyzes these questions, explaining why recent economic developments have been widely misunderstood and in some cases almost completely ignored. Drawing on the history of other financial crises, recessions, and recoveries, Weisbrot argues that economically feasible choices remain for Eurozone governments to greatly reduce unemployment - including in crisis-ridden Greece. 

Because our events are offered free of charge, seats are made available until we reach capacity; after that point, we can no longer accommodate pre-registered guests.

Contact Information:
Phone: 212-992-8380
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

October 6, 2015

04:00:00 PM - 06:00:00 PM

UNCTAD Trade Development Report Launch @ The New School

Location:

Starr Foundation Hall, UL102 (lower level)
University Center, 63 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10003

Event:

The New School for Social Research will host the launch of the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development's (UNCTAD) Trade and Development Report 2015: Making the International Financial Architecture Work for Trade and Development. The report identifies some of the critical issues to be addressed in order to establish a more stable and inclusive international monetary and financial system which can support trade and development challenges over the coming years.

Presentations will be made by Dean Baker, Executive Director of the Center for Economic Policy Research in Washington, and Elissa Braunstein, Associate Professor at Colorado State University and a consultant with UNCTAD. William Milberg, Dean of the New School for Social Research, will provide introductory remarks.

Cost:

Free; No tickets or reservations required. Seating is first come, first served

October 1, 2015

01:30:00 PM - 03:00:00 PM

Haiti's Elections—How to Ensure a Legitimate Outcome

Hosts:

Center for Economic and Policy Research

Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti

1804 Institute

Location:

Cannon House Office Building, Room 441
27 Independence Ave SE
Washington, DC 20003

RSVP requested (email main [at] cepr.net)

Haiti is in the midst of an unprecedented electoral cycle, with three elections scheduled in 2015. With legislative and local elections long delayed, the entire 118-member lower house, two-thirds of the Senate, the President and all local officials will be elected this year. The United States has already contributed $25 million for the process and has pledged an additional $5 million. The first round of legislative elections took place on August 9, though election day was plagued by extremely low voter turnout, violence and other irregularities. Nearly 25 percent of votes were never counted. The next round will include presidential elections and is scheduled to take place on October 25. This panel of Haitian and U.S. experts will examine the causes of the problems of August 9 and discuss steps that must be taken to ensure that the next two rounds of elections result in legitimately-elected authorities.

Panelists:

Pierre Esperance, Executive Director, National Human Rights Defense Network (RNDDH) and national election observer

Yolette Mengual, Current Member, Haiti's Provisional Electoral Council (CEP)

Jake Johnston, Research Associate, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR)

September 29, 2015

02:15:00 PM

Hearing on "The Disrupter Series: How the Sharing Economy Creates Jobs, Benefits Consumers, and Raises Policy Questions"

Hosts:
Subcommittee on Commerce, Manufacturing, and Trade
Energy and Commerce

Location:
2322 Rayburn House Office Building

CEPR's Dean Baker will testify at this hearing on Tuesday, September 29, 2015, at 10:15 a.m. in 2322 Rayburn House Office Building. The hearing is entitled "The Disrupter Series: How the Sharing Economy Creates Jobs, Benefits Consumers, and Raises Policy Questions."

September 24, 2015

10:30:00 PM - 12:00:00 AM

September 24, 2015
6:30pm -8:00pm
UCDC, 1608 Rhode Island Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20036

Register here

World Affairs Council -DC will host CEPR co-Director Mark Weisbrot in a discussion of his new book Failed: What the Experts Got Wrong About the Global Economy (Oxford University Press), available October 1st.

 

"Comprehensive, long overdue and a resounding success" - The Guardian

FailedBookCover

Why did the Eurozone end up with an unemployment rate more than twice that of the United States, more than six years after the collapse of Lehman Brothers? Why did the vast majority of low-and-middle-income countries suffer a prolonged economic slowdown in the last two decades of the 20th century? What was the role of the International Monetary Fund in these economic failures? Why was Latin America able to achieve substantial poverty reduction in the 21st century after more than two decades without any progress?

Failed analyzes and ties together some of the most important economic developments of recent years, with the common theme that they have been widely misunderstood and in some cases almost completely ignored.

A wine and cheese reception will follow the program. Copies of the book will be available for sale and signing.

Register here

September 17, 2015

07:00:00 PM - 08:30:00 PM

Congressional Black Caucus Foundation Annual Legislative Conference 2015

Honorary Host(s):
Congressman John Conyers Jr.
Congressman, Michigan-13, Washington, District of Columbia

Location:
Walter E. Washington Convention Center
Room 143A

While the reported jobless rate in America is now well under 6%, the real jobless rate is nearly 13% when we take into account those who have become too discouraged to continue looking for work and people unable to find full-time work. The rate is upwards of 25% in some communities of color. This session will focus on the need for national full employment legislation, a higher minimum wage, and innovative new strategies to promote locally-driven job creation; and address the systemic challenges of stagnant wages, declining benefits, and unsatisfactory opportunities for long-term advancement. The panel will highlight the promise of Congressman Conyers' HR 1000—the 21st Humphrey-Hawkins Century Full Employment and Training Act, as well as innovative best practices from around the nation in promoting job creation through community wealth-building, employee ownership, and other strategies for inclusive growth.

September 3, 2015

04:00:00 AM - 07:00:00 PM

September 3, 2015
4:00 - 7:00PM

SRH 1.208, University of Texas, Austin
2300 Red River Street D0800
Austin, TX 78712

Since the end of the Cold War, no government in the hemisphere—even Cuba—has been the focus of such persistent tensions with the US, and such divergent explanations for commonly observed events and conditions. The extreme political polarization of Venezuelan society echoes and reinforces these perplexing divergences. This Foro Urgente will feature the analysis of six recognized experts on Venezuelan politics, economics, and society—including two Venezuelan citizens—followed by direct engagement with one another over key differences in fact and interpretation. Three questions will guide this lively educational dialogue: 1) what are the root explanations for the stark deterioration of social life—violence, economic distress, intractable political conflict—in Venezuela today? 2) how should we understand the US role in this social suffering, and how might the US best contribute to its alleviation? 3) even amid chronic polarization, are there constructive principles on which most Venezuelans might agree as a basis for exploring resolutions to this multifaceted crisis?

This forum will be free and open to the public. 

Panelists:

Javier Corrales, Dwight W. Morrow 1895 Professor of Political Science at Amherst College

Miriam Kornblith, Director for Latin America and the Caribbean at the National Endowment for Democracy in Washington, D.C.

Margarita López-Maya, Titular Professor at the Center for Development Studies (CENDES) at the Central University of Venezuela 

David Smilde, Charles A. and Leo M. Favrot Professor of Social Relations, Department of Sociology at Tulane University

Cristobal Valencia, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of New Mexico

Mark Wiesbrot, Co-Director, Center for Economic and Policy Research in Washington, D.C

August 30, 2015

03:00:00 PM - 08:00:00 PM

August 30, 2015
11:00AM-4:00PM

Abramson Family Recital Hall, Katzen Arts Center 

American University
4400 Massachusetts Avenue, NW
Washington, D.C. 20016

The Society for Ethics, Peace and Global Affairs presents:

A daylong conference featuring three panels of authors and activists to discuss the intersection of the ongoing war on drugs, U.S. foreign policy, the criminalization of drug use, and mass incarceration in the United States.

Featuring panelists:

David Victorson: author of memoir 37 Tons, former drug smuggler and prison reform activist
Dawn Paley: journalist and author of Drug War Capitalism
Nick Schou: journalist at OC Weekly and author of Killing the Messenger, Orange Sunshine and The Weed Runners
Walker Grooms: National Grassroots Organizer, Witness for Peace
Michael Collins: Policy Manager, Drug Policy Alliance
Alex Main: Senior Associate, Center for Economic and Policy Research
Arturo Viscarra: Advocacy Coordinator, School of the Americas Watch
Sanho Tree: Director of Drug Policy Project, Institute for Policy Studies
Douglas Husak: author of Drugs and Rights and Legalize This! The Case for Decriminalizing Drugs, professor of philosophy at Rutgers University
Dan Riffle: Director, Federal Policies at Marijuana Policy Project
Brenden Beck: Co-founder of Milk Not Prisons and independent writer
Betty Aldworth: Executive Director, Students for Sensible Drug Policy


RSVP Here

July 21, 2015

12:00:00 AM - 01:30:00 AM

A free webinar sponsored by the Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti (IJDH).


About This Conference:


The Bureau des Avocats Internationaux and IJDH work to protect the right of Haitians to select their government through fair elections. A key aspect of that work is ensuring that the international community has credible information about Haiti's political situation. Join this web conference to learn more about the key issues currently being discussed in Haitian and international media. Afterwards, we look forward to answering your questions.

Presenters:
-Jake Johnston, Research Associate at the Center for Economic and Policy Research, will provide background on elections in Haiti.

-Jacqueline Charles, Caribbean Correspondent of Miami Herald, will provide updates and discuss the challenges she faces in reporting on elections.

-Wesley Lainé, IJDH Legal Intern, will analyze the décharge issue which has disqualified a few candidates. This will include the controversial disqualification of Jacky Lumarque, former coordinator of a presidential commission on education.

Here's some background info on décharge: http://haitielection2015.blogspot.com/2015/07/the-cep-and-elections-in-haiti-decharge.html

The agenda for this web conference:

  • Background on Haiti's elections
  • Updates and challenges reporting on elections
  • Décharge and disqualified candidates
  • Question and Answer Session

This webinar is free, but registration is required. Register here.